Here are the winners of the #Forests2015 blog competition!

Anne-Gaelle Borg (L) and Nikki Chaudhary (R) won the top prizes...

Anne-Gaelle Borg (L) and Nikki Chaudhary (R)
won the top blog competition prizes…


 
Our #Forests2015 blog competition received 63 entries from 32 countries. The battle was fierce, but also fun.

While we agree with “Hot Chocolate” who sung “Everyone’s a winner” back in 1978, we HAD to select a few, who were more “winning” than others.. 🙂

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Embrace new species

A standing matured Ficus mucuso tree

A standing matured Ficus mucuso tree

Trees are one of the wonders of nature, no tree species is useless.

I needed to get good wood from the market to construct a reading table in my room. On getting to the market I couldn’t get my desired wood species, as it was not in stock, because of the high demand for it.

I asked is there no other substitute. The plank seller introduced me to another species “Ficus mucoso” but I was not willing to buy any other. I went back home dissatisfied. But some years after I decided to research on this species: Ficus mucuso.

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If a tree falls in the forest and no one has seen or heard it fall, did it really fall?

Dr. Urša Vilhar conducting forest experiments

Dr. Urša Vilhar conducting forest experiments

In the 21st century, communication skills for natural scientists, experts and professionals, are essential.

It’s 4 o’clock in the afternoon and the sunlit beech-spruce forest behind the Slovenian Forestry Institute is full of children who are watching dr. Urša Vilhar. She is demonstrating how the water flow over the trunk of the tree is measured and makes a reading from the instrument used for this research.

The wide-eyed children ask bright, yet sometimes unrelated questions, which Urša happily answers. Later, they are going to visit one of the institute’s laboratories and conduct some experiments of their own. At home, they are going to tell their parents about what they have learned and maybe, just maybe, some of them will treasure this experience and walk a path in their life that is connected to forests and nature.

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Rethinking the relationship between forests and other land uses

Figure 1: The comparison photos in Hetian village in Changting. The top picture is taken in 2000 and the bottom picture is taken in 2009.

Figure 1: The comparison photos in Hetian village in Changting. The top picture is taken in 2000
and the bottom picture is taken in 2009.

The relationship and interaction between forests and other land uses are interesting and attract many scholars from diverse disciplines. Although there are quite a lot of distinctive and exciting findings in this area, there remain underdeveloped aspects that prevent a full appreciation of the complexity of the phenomenon.

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The relationship between the forest and food security in Changting County, China

Tu Chengyue

Feeding the world’s largest population is one of the most pressing challenges facing Chinese people. Forests as well as trees on farms are a direct source of food for rural people, providing both staple foods and supplemental foods such as tea, fruits, edible fungi, Chinese herbal medicines, wild meat and so on.

We selected Changting County (located in Fujian province, southern of China) to make a case study by interviewing local people, and make a household survey. We focused on exploring the relationship between forest and food security in different period of time. That is, how do the different economic-social development conditions in history shape the relationship between forests and food security?

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Revelando el universo microbiano del suelo como armonizador en bosques y grupos humanos

El aprovechamiento de los hongos y otros microorganismos es una práctica ancestral global que se aprende en los primeros años de vida como una forma de supervivencia y para preservar nuestra cultura ancestral planetaria

El aprovechamiento de los hongos y otros microorganismos es una práctica ancestral global que se aprende en los primeros años de vida como una forma de supervivencia y para preservar nuestra cultura ancestral planetaria

Xóchitl (nombre en náhuatl que significa, “la reina de las flores”) es una mujer que enviudó muy joven y que sobrevivió con sus dos pequeños hijos, recolectando microbios comestibles, en una comunidad indígena náhuatl, muy cerca del “ombligo de la luna”, como le llamaban los antiguos mexicas al sitio en el Lago de Texcoco donde se fundó la actual Ciudad de México.

La vivienda de Xóchitl se ubica en las inmediaciones del Monte “Tlaloc” (en náhuatl: “néctar de la tierra”-“tlal”= tierra; “octli”= “néctar”); un lugar boscoso y místico, donde se dice que habita el “Dios de la lluvia”; al que han venerado las antiguas culturas mesoamericanas por representar el agua celestial y considerarlo responsable de las sequías y lluvias torrenciales.

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“I Am Not a Waste”

Building resilience with forests

Building resilience with forests

Africa is blessed with natural and human resources but the attitude to manage these resources are lacking in our minds. Few personalities have tried to improve the standard of living of people in this region of the world but it just couldn’t work due to our general attitude.

Some countries have resulted to packaging bottles or sachets of water. This has contributed to level of environmental pollution through indiscriminate waste disposal. The used bottles or sachets of water are regularly discarded into the street after consumption and this has resulted into havoc that causes destruction of lives and properties.

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