Side Event: Integrative approaches to improve sustainable forest management under climate change

One of our four research forests where innovative models and tools for climate change adaptation are being used - Central Highlands Region, Victoria, Australia

One of our four research forests where innovative models and tools for climate change adaptation are being used – Central Highlands Region, Victoria, Australia

Forests provide a unique challenge and major opportunity for climate change mitigation, with a fine line between their immense capacity to either contribute to or mitigate climate change.

Sustainable forest management is crucial, as a decrease in the health and resilience of forest ecosystems can cause transition from a carbon sink to a carbon source. Maintaining these ecosystems is not only an effective climate change mitigation strategy, but is also important for the millions that depend on forests for social and economic needs.

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Cost effective systems for multi-purpose national forest monitoring

Cessna-mounted fully automated and autonomously working aerial imaging and LIDAR unit

Cessna-mount fully automated and autonomously working
aerial imaging and LIDAR unit

The demand for information on landscapes including forests and other vegetation, agriculture, settlements and infrastructure has tremendously increased in recent years.

As the international community is further developing mechanisms for implementing concrete, measurable and verifiable actions within the framework of global environmental conventions such as on climate change, biodiversity conservation and combatting desertification, there is a growing need for information on a wide range of ecological, social and economic aspects at the landscape scale including forests and trees.

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LIFEGENMON: LIFE+ for European forest genetic monitoring system

LOGO LIFEGENMON

In the beginning of the 20th century, Edvard Pogačnik bought forest lands in Pohorje, Slovenia, Central Europe, which he initially described as “in an unfavourable state”. He attributed their condition to inappropriate forest management and used a mixture of systematic observations and forest care to create a forest of “especially appealing structure and quality” (Martin Čokl, 1959). He has independently developed a forest control method and his autochthonous system of forest management is comparable to the most advanced forest management methods of the time.

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Embrace new species

A standing matured Ficus mucuso tree

A standing matured Ficus mucuso tree

Trees are one of the wonders of nature, no tree species is useless.

I needed to get good wood from the market to construct a reading table in my room. On getting to the market I couldn’t get my desired wood species, as it was not in stock, because of the high demand for it.

I asked is there no other substitute. The plank seller introduced me to another species “Ficus mucoso” but I was not willing to buy any other. I went back home dissatisfied. But some years after I decided to research on this species: Ficus mucuso.

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Revelando el universo microbiano del suelo como armonizador en bosques y grupos humanos

El aprovechamiento de los hongos y otros microorganismos es una práctica ancestral global que se aprende en los primeros años de vida como una forma de supervivencia y para preservar nuestra cultura ancestral planetaria

El aprovechamiento de los hongos y otros microorganismos es una práctica ancestral global que se aprende en los primeros años de vida como una forma de supervivencia y para preservar nuestra cultura ancestral planetaria

Xóchitl (nombre en náhuatl que significa, “la reina de las flores”) es una mujer que enviudó muy joven y que sobrevivió con sus dos pequeños hijos, recolectando microbios comestibles, en una comunidad indígena náhuatl, muy cerca del “ombligo de la luna”, como le llamaban los antiguos mexicas al sitio en el Lago de Texcoco donde se fundó la actual Ciudad de México.

La vivienda de Xóchitl se ubica en las inmediaciones del Monte “Tlaloc” (en náhuatl: “néctar de la tierra”-“tlal”= tierra; “octli”= “néctar”); un lugar boscoso y místico, donde se dice que habita el “Dios de la lluvia”; al que han venerado las antiguas culturas mesoamericanas por representar el agua celestial y considerarlo responsable de las sequías y lluvias torrenciales.

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How cutting down trees can save the Amazon

Victor Solano, a seasoned forester at MADERACRE

Victor Solano, a seasoned forester at MADERACRE

In Peru, the current deforestation rate is approximately 261,000 ha per year – that’s 3.5 Singapore’s every year! – and illegal logging is a significant factor. But, the country, and its people, need to utilize the Amazon’s resources to develop, so leaving it untouched is not an option for those who rely on it for their livelihoods. The surprising solution may seem contradictory, but there is a way that meets the needs of Peru’s population without compromising the needs of future generations – and, yes, it involves cutting down more trees.

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